What to do after a break-in – emergency checklist

A break-in is always a major, and often traumatic experience

The police calls. There’s been a break-in at your home. You’re in a meeting, at the theatre or a birthday party; the police gathers evidence in your apartment. You want to get back home as quickly as possible. Jewellery, money and pictures have been stolen. You’re in a state of shock. You think of the endless formalities and chores you’ll have to wade through: repairs, insurance statements, cleaning up. But the most unbearable part of it all is that a stranger has invaded your private space.

 

If you do happen to catch the burglar in the act, you must follow the golden rule: Don’t be a hero!

Do not put yourself or others at risk, your personal safety is the top priority.

Observe the following principles:

  • Never get in the way of intruders
  • Remain calm, get to safety
  • Alert the police by calling the emergency number 112 or 117
  • If possible, do not enter your house or flat before the police arrive
  • Do not touch anything

After the break-in

After a break-in, victims often feel abandoned. Lots of break-ins are never resolved, the perpetrators get away undetected and often never leave any usable clues behind. The full impact and effects of the fear and psychological stress often only emerge later on, but there are lots of things to sort out straight after the incident.

That’s why Securitas Direct recommends you do the following:

  • Inform your insurance company
  • Make a list of the stolen items and include receipts, photos, warranty certificates, etc.
  • Block stolen credit/debit cards
  • Block your e-banking
  • Create new passwords for your PC, laptop, mobile
  • Change the locks on your doors if the keys are missing
  • Organise tradesmen for the repairs

Victims are hit by the hard reality of what happened when they clear up the mess. They see broken locks, smashed outdoor lighting and windows, damaged furniture, ransacked cupboards, and blatant acts of malicious destruction.

This experience can trigger a whole range of emotions: shock, anger, horror, aggression, grief, fear. Because of this brute violation of their private space, victims torment themselves thinking about all the things the intruders touched, what papers they read, and so on.

The property is most likely trashed and valuables stolen, but far more painful is the loss of what cannot be replaced: stolen keepsakes of insignificant monetary value, but priceless emotional value.

Tips for victims

It helps to talk to process the trauma. Talk about what happened, describe how this intrusion into your home made you feel. Be open about your anger towards the burglars, how you feel powerless, your fear, your pain, the losses you suffered. If you need to, seek professional, psychological help.
 
Sooner or later the question of whether you could have protected your home better will arise. Could you have prevented this intrusion?
Don’t blame yourself! Act now.
 
Find out what preventive measures you can take to improve the protection of your property.
 
After a break-in, your home is no longer a safe place. Possible psychological reactions include difficulty sleeping, anxiety, and some people even consider moving.

It helps to talk to process the trauma. Talk about what happened, describe how this intrusion into your home made you feel. Be open about your anger towards the burglars, how you feel powerless, your fear, your pain, the losses you suffered. If you need to, seek professional, psychological help.
 
Sooner or later the question of whether you could have protected your home better will arise. Could you have prevented this intrusion?
Don’t blame yourself! Act now.
 
Find out what preventive measures you can take to improve the protection of your property.
 
After a break-in, your home is no longer a safe

Stop! None of this will protect you from burglars breaking into your home.

You could invest in some good outdoor lighting and motion detectors, erect a high fence around your property, and get a guard dog. You can secure your doors and window with expensive and intricate structural mechanisms.
But it is much more secure, straightforward and, above all, efficient to protect your property with an alarm system
What-to-do-after-a-break-in-emergency-checklist

Cheap offers are a dime a dozen in every hardware store. Unfortunately, these are neither adapted to your individual needs nor connected to an alarm receiving centre. In the event of a break-in or attempted break-in, you are responsible for alerting the police and taking care of the entire claims process. Not exactly an easy feat when you’re halfway across the world on holiday.
But with a smart alarm system from Securitas Direct you benefit from a security plan that is adapted to suit your personal needs. The stickers outside already act as a deterrent. If the intruder still breaks into your home, they will not go unseen thanks to the flashing lights, siren and cameras. Within a matter of seconds, the alarm sounds at Securitas Direct, the photos are analysed and the police is called in. A member of the Securitas team is at the premises working with the police. He represents you if you’re not there and arranges for the door to be repaired.

SECURITAS DIRECT PROVIDES AN ALL-ROUND SENSE OF ASSURANCE ...

WHAT TO DO AFTER A BREAK-IN – EMERGENCY CHECKLIST

... Even when nobody is at home.

According to insurance statistics, damages and losses from break-ins are approx. 90% lower in houses or flats with an alarm system.

Give yourself the best possible protection. We offer a no-obligation, expert consultation. Take our security check now.

What else may interest you

What type of alarm systems are there?

There are differences in alarms and alarm systems - find out about the different types now.
read more

Protection against break- ins – What you need to know

Our valuables are important to us and our private space is sacred. If it is violated during a break-in, we usually suffer considerable damages. All the more reason to opt for preventive measures.
read more

Securing your doors and windows: our tips

Doors and windows are the biggest security risk. We explain how you can secure them with our alarm systems.
read more